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Save The Earth and Pacific Dry Goods have teamed up to protect the environment.

One product of Pacific Dry Goods is the Bamboo EcoTowl.  It is 82 % bamboo fiber and 18 % corn, making it super absorbent for household use and biodegradable.

Pacific Dry Goods has also donated the EcoTowl for oil spill clean up testing to the California Department of Fish and Game’s Oiled Wildlife and Veterinary Care Center.  This towel may be key for bird and sea otter clean up in potential future spills along the West Coast of the the United States.  Information from the test may also be helpful for the Gulf Oil disaster.

For more information on the Eco Towel, see: https://www.pacificdrygoods.com/?q=ecoline

For a virtual tour of and more information on the Oiled Wildlife and Veterinary Care Center, see: http://www.mwvcrc.org/content/view/46/80/

Lori Wilson Park July 31st


Event
  • A free 3 mile group paddle to raise awareness to the Gulf disaster. Please feel to paddle whatever you desire; whether it be a surfboard, SUP board, canoe, kayak, or anything else. This is not a race we will paddle as one unit.
  • Free and optional Bible Study in the park, bibles will be provided.
  • Free optional 1 hour beach or park yoga session (please bring mats or beach towel)
  • If you do not wish to partake an any of these activities, please, please, please still come out and support the event and join with your community!
Purpose
  • To form a group within the community that shares a passion to make a difference in this world, and to work towards finding a solution to the Gulf disaster
  • To raise funds to clean up the oil spill and keep God’s creation, our Earth clean
Effect
  • We will have a unified group working towards making our planet a better place to live
  • If you feel it in your heart to make a donation, 100% of the funds raised will be given to The Save the Earth Foundation. They have been working diligently with NOAA on ocean projects targeting the gulf, and have the resources and knowledge to clean up this mess.

When: July 31st. Paddle begins at 9AM and will last approx. 45min-1hour
Bible study will begin at 10:30AM and last about 45 minutes
Yoga session will be directly following

Where: North Lori Wilson Park under the West Pavilion

Lori Wilson Park is located about a mile and a half south of S.R. 520 on A1A in Cocoa Beach Florida


ScienceDaily (June 4, 2010) — Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions not only lead to global warming, but also cause another, less well-known but equally disconcerting environmental change: ocean acidification. A group of 35 researchers of the EU-funded EPOCA project have just started the first major CO2 perturbation experiment in the Arctic Ocean. Their goal is to determine the response of Arctic marine life to the rapid change in ocean chemistry.

Click the link below to read more

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603092018.htm

Due to the Nashville floods, thousands OF PEOPLE are left without any clothes to wear or food to eat. The Rick Hendrix Foundation is in need!!!!!

Rick Hendrix FB:http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Save-The-Earth-Foundation/95785143882#!/pages/Rick-Hendrix/109769627486?ref=ts

CLOTHES OF ALL SIZES-ESPECIALLY KIDS CLOTHES, BASKETBALL SHORTS, T-SHIRTS–PANTS 32-34, SWEAT PANTS

NON PERISHABLE FOODS
SHOES OF ALL SIZES
ANY HOUSE HOLD GOODS
BIBLES
CARS
GIFT CARDS TO FOOD STORES OR WALMART
VOLUNTEERS TO HAND OUT FOOD, DO HOUSE CHECKS WITH FEMA AND TEMA
VOLUNTEERS TO TEAR OUT WALLS AND FLOOD DAMAGED HOMES
ANY BUILDING SUPPLIES

Send ALL ITEMS OR EMAIL FOR A PICK UP SCHEDULE ANYWHERE IN THE COUNTRY FOR LARGER ITEMS

SEND EVERYTHING TO

Rick Hendrix Foundation

7051 Hwy 70 South Box 117

Nashville,TN 37221

Of the marine world’s many mysteries, few is greater than its role in terrestrial life. The ocean supplies fish and jobs and recreation, but its infinite colonies of unseen phytoplankton create about half of all the oxygen we breathe. To say the ocean is connected to the air, not to mention the weather and food chain, is to understate things.

So we take sharp notice of a preliminary report from the National Research Council, which finds that acid levels in seawater worldwide are rising to the point at which sea life, as well as living coral reefs, could be harmed. The culprit: rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, much of it from human activity.

Oceans are sponges for atmospheric CO2 — they sop it up at an astonishing rate and for 800,000 years held their pH levels rock steady. But that changed after the Industrial Revolution, which fused human progress with CO2 emissions, and ocean pH levels are now on the slide. The result is ugly.

Experiments show harm is brought to the shell- and skeleton-building capacity of reef-building corals, oysters and mussels, as well as some phytoplankton and zooplankton species at the floor of marine food webs. In a few instances, marine biologists have corroborated this in ocean investigations.

We may well be poisoning the ocean with CO2, the same bad-actor gas tied to rising global temperatures.

Not everything underwater will go bad. Some species may flourish in lower pH environments, creating a lottery of winners and losers, and nobody’s saying our oxygen supply is at stake.

But it is a grave thought that our CO2 lifestyle is tainting ocean water to the extent it could hurt us — one estimate has ocean acidity rising by 200 percent by the end of the century. Along with its known benefits, a healthy ocean is prolific in the biodiversity that promises discoveries in biomedicine — our own Amazon.

Ocean acidification sounds wonky. But it’s quite down to earth and calls for urgency by the United States and several countries, with European nations well along. Right now eight federal agencies, among them the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration headed by Oregonian Jane Lubchenco, scramble to figure the next best steps.

One of them, outlined by the NRC, should be to expand ocean testing for CO2 and pH levels. It sounds small but isn’t. To test well involves placing new sensors on existing moorings but also creating more sites with more gauges — all reporting in real time to data centers that sort and make legible the health of the ocean. Only then will we really know what’s up and, maybe, what to do.

But getting there will take money, leadership, collective will. We know how well nations collaborate on a problem as shared as climate change — may ocean acidification dodge that fate as handily as it shed its polarizing nickname of global warming’s “evil twin.”

The NRC’s full report will be published soon. Congress deserves credit for requesting the review in the first place. Now it should pay heed with an open wallet, as the tab could run $50 million a year to do proper global testing, according to calculations by Richard Feely, NOAA’s top-gun researcher in Seattle, and colleagues. Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell, aware that sharp acidification has been gauged in Northwest waters, has done right in signaling alarm; now she is encouraged to push hard for America’s share of the funding.

An already concerned White House, meanwhile, must substantially raise the profile of ocean acidification as an international challenge that won’t go away without somehow reining in CO2 emissions.

Source: http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2010/05/neath_the_great_blue_lies_an_o.html

Save The Earth is a partner with NOAA on addressing marine debris problems in the ocean.
What ideas do you have to share with us on how marine debris impacts us and what we should do about it?
Students K – 8th grade are encouraged to participate in a marine debris art contest that is open through June 1, 2010.

Ocean acidification – dubbed global warning’s“evil twin” – is a potentially disastrous consequence of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere, according to a recent report from theNational Research Council.

The report says that ocean chemistry is changing faster than it has in hundreds of thousands of years because of the CO2 being absorbed from the atmosphere. The resulting increased acidity of the oceans poses a serious threat to shellfish and other marine life.

The increased acidity corrodes seashells, and thousands of species build shells around them to live. “It removes the building block for producing shells,” Steve Palumbi of Stanford University said last year. “A lot of organisms may not be able to survive.”

The ocean absorbs approximately a third of man-made carbon dioxide emissions, including those from fossil-fuel use, cement production, and deforestation, the report says. The CO2 taken up by the ocean decreases the pH of the water and leads to a combination of chemical changes collectively known as ocean acidification.

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the average pH of ocean surface waters has decreased approximately 0.1 unit – from about 8.2 to 8.1 – making them more acidic.  Models project an additional 0.2 to 0.3 drop by the end of the century.

This rate of change exceeds any known to have occurred in hundreds of thousands of years, the report says.  The ocean will become more acidic on average as surface waters continue to absorb atmospheric CO2.

“Unless anthropogenic CO2 emissions are substantially curbed, or atmospheric CO2 is controlled by some other means, the average pH of the ocean will continue to fall,” according to the report. “Ocean acidification has demonstrated impacts on many marine organisms. While the ultimate consequences are still unknown, there is a risk of ecosystem changes that threaten coral reefs, fisheries, protected species, and other natural resources of value to society.”

Actress Sigourney Weaver (above) appeared at a Senate hearing last week, urging lawmakers to pass carbon legislation that would limit carbon emissions.

By Doyle Rice

Source: http://content.usatoday.com/communities/sciencefair/post/2010/04/report-acidic-oceans-are-an-impending-disaster/1

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